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The ICCROM Classifieds are a service to the professional institutions of our Member States. The Classifieds list announcements on conservation-related topics and events from around the world. Posting of items in the Classifieds does not imply endorsement by ICCROM. Read the full disclaimer

Change Over Time

March 20, 2017

Publication

Call for Articles

The University of Pennsylvania, , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

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Description
Call for Papers: Change Over Time
Gentrification and Heritage Conservation | Fall 2018
Guest Editors: Caroline Cheong and Kecia Fong

The term gentrification is used to describe both a process and outcome of physical, socioeconomic, and demographic neighborhood change. Its association with the displacement of low-income households by wealthier ones has overshadowed more nuanced understandings of the relationship between the historic built environment, conservation, and gentrification. This issue seeks to address this under-examined intersection. According to Rose (2001), neighborhoods with a high likelihood for gentrifying exhibit five key attributes:
1) a high percentage of renters; 2) easy access to the central business district; 3) location within a region of increasing metropolitan density; 4) high architectural value; and 5) relatively low housing values. In this schema, urban conservation is commonly considered to be a precursor to gentrification, particularly in distressed historic areas (Smith 1998; Glaser 2010).

Gentrification drivers span from market trends to government-sponsored initiatives. In a market-led context, undervalued historic neighborhoods contain desirable attributes for incoming households, not least of which is the sense of place and continuity inherent within the historic built environment. In public scenarios, governments explicitly target historic neighborhoods for regeneration. In nearly all cases, existing, usually low or middle income households, face potential displacement. While gentrification has received ample scholarly attention, its occurrence in historic areas – and its interaction with heritage – is less thoroughly documented. This issue interrogates the relationship, past and present, between gentrification and heritage conservation. It does so by exploring questions related to heritage conservation in changing neighborhoods such as: Are historic neighborhoods necessarily targets for gentrification? What are the challenges and opportunities facing these areas, or those that are presently or have already undergone such processes? What other, more inclusive scenarios exist wherein urban conservation serves as a vehicle for neighborhood preservation? How can historians, conservation professionals, planners, and others allow for the concomitant retention of heritage and regeneration values? What variables are required in negotiating this balance? Who are the primary stakeholders and what roles do they play in the process of neighborhood change?

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ICAR – International Journal of Young Conservators and Restorers of Works of Art

March 8, 2017

Publication

Call for Articles

ICAR – International Journal of Young Conservators and Restorers of Works of Art, , United Kingdom

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Description
On behalf of the Editorial Board I would like to invite all emerging conservators to submit abstracts of their papers to the new issue of “ICAR – International Journal of Young Conservators and Restorers of Works of Art”. The first issue is now in print and will be available to order in March 2017 (printed version and digital version of full journal and single articles).

Call for Papers for the second issue of ICAR – International Journal of Young Conservators and Restorers of Works of Art is open until 31st of March 2017.

Further detailed guidelines about how to publish in “ICAR” are available at:
• www.icarthejournal.org – our website
• www.facebook.com/icarthejournal – Facebook profile of ICAR
• www.facebook.com/events/1516090038431777 – Facebook event “Call for papers – 2nd issue of ICAR”

Paulina Miąsik
Head of the Office of ICAR


International Journal Of Environmental Science & Sustainable Development (ESSD)

March 6, 2017

Publication

New Publication / Nouvelle publication

Ierek Press, , Egypt

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Description
Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development (ESSD) is a multidisciplinary journal that is devoted to propagating peer reviewed, original, high quality academic research papers. ESSD is designed for the publication of selected papers from IEREK conferences proceedings and individual academic articles that fall within our scope. ESSD’s scope is intended for professionals and academic researchers in all fields of Environmental Sciences and Sustainable Development, with significant advances and discoveries in all aspects, which can be used in real life and simulated applications for sustainable buildings, and cities, development, detection and measurement of environmental contaminants, and the assessment and validation of the impact of development that emerges instrumental techniques. ESSD welcomes practical application to an aspect of human endeavor, such as the preservation of the environment, health, waste disposal and seeks to offer solutions for environmental issues s
uch as Renewable & Non Renewable Resources, Climate Change, and Social& Economic Issues.


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The ICCROM Classifieds are a service to the professional institutions of our Member States. The Classifieds list announcements on conservation-related topics and events from around the world. They are made available to ICCROM's public solely for informational purposes. Posting of items in the Classifieds does not imply endorsement by ICCROM. Job fraud is a worldwide concern. Please consult this page at ReliefWeb for some tips to stay away from fraud: http://reliefweb.int/job-fraud.