LATAM stone conservation course ends

November 2, 2016

LATAM stone conservation course ends

The LATAM stone conservation course took place in Mexico, from 10 to 22 October 2016. This two-week course focused on “Observation, documentation and diagnosis”, and combined a series of theoretical and practical sessions. The eleven participants, including archaeologists, architects, conservators and geologists, used the Maya archaeological site of Chicanná as a case study. Continue reading…


Conservation of Stone in Latin America and the Caribbean

October 27, 2015

The LATAM International Course on Stone Conservation: Observation, Documentation and Diagnosis recently concluded in Mexico. During the three-week course, eleven participants from Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Paraguay, Peru and Mexico had practical and theoretical sessions at the archaeological site of Tula and in Mexico City.

The first week was devoted to a detailed observation of case-studies at Tula, where participants applied the Objective Visual Observation (OVO) method. During the second week, they used a variety of documentation methods. The last week was devoted to additional archival and laboratory research, in order to synthesize all of the information and prepare a diagnosis and condition assessment of the case studies. Participants also shared their own experiences by presenting case studies from their home countries.

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Communication and teaching skills

July 20, 2015

International Summer School on Communication and Teaching skills in Conservation and Science
13 – 24 July 2015. Rome, Italy

The second edition of the International Summer School on Communication and Teaching skills in Conservation and Science began on 15 July at the ICCROM headquarters in Rome. This two-week training session has brought together professionals from a variety of countries and backgrounds to explore the potential of different didactic approaches, approaches to learning about conservation and science, and revisiting existing practices. Learning is taking place through interactive sessions both in the classroom and around Rome. Continue reading…


New fellow: Juliana Forero Bordamalo

May 26, 2015

Juliana Forero from Colombia is starting a fellowship at ICCROMICCROM welcomes Juliana Forero Bordamalo from Colombia. She will be with us until mid July. Juliana is a Programme Specialist for Research at the World Heritage Institute of Training and Research for the Asia and the Pacific Region (WHITRAP-UNESCO). Juliana is an anthropologist who holds a PhD in Urban Studies from Huazhong University of Science and Technology (HUST), China, and a Master in Social Anthropology from Universidad de los Andes, Colombia.

From 2004-2008 she worked in cultural heritage management at the City Hall of Bogotá and the Ministry of Culture of Colombia. Since 2008 Juliana has been in China, linked to the laboratory of Sustainable Development of the School of Urban Planning (HUST) and the Cultural Bureau of Hubei Province, working on cultural heritage conservation and sustainability in the cities of Wuhan, Guangdong and Qinzhou, among others.  Juliana focuses her research on heritage’s social function, community participation, public policies, as well as notions of memory, territory and identity, Western and Asian shifts of cultural heritage concept and historic urban landscape.

While at ICCROM she will be developing a Capacity Building Programme for the application of the 2011 UNESCO Recommendation on the Historic Urban Landscape (HUL) lead by WHITRAP. At the same, time she will work on the enhancing of the HUL research and application network.

Member State represented: Colombia


Course on Stone Conservation begins in Rome

April 15, 2015

Another stone course?
What’s new?
What’s different?

poster for the 2015 stone courseFor the nineteenth time since 1976 a group of mid-career professionals from 20 different countries are gathering for the International Course on Stone Conservation co-organized by ICCROM in partnership with the Getty Conservation Institute. The Non-Catholic Cemetery in Rome will be hosting the field activities throughout the course and YoCoCu will provide assistance during lab exercises.

Thirty-two lecturers from universities, museums, national cultural organizations and conservation practices all over the world have been selected to offer the best possible training in the field. The ICCROM-Getty team will be running the course together for the fourth time now, with ICCROM Consultant Simon Warrack and GCI Project Specialist Benjamin Marcus acting as course coordinators.

We received over ninety applications and it is a tough job to select 20 from so many enthusiastic and competent applicants. The participants are the life blood of the course and it is they who benefit from not only the training but the shared work and life experience from all over the world. They will take this new knowledge back to their countries to share with their colleagues and students. Continue reading…


First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

March 27, 2015

30 March – 24 April 2015, Netherlands

First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

Is it possible to save cultural heritage from the intentional targeting that we are witnessing in Syria and Iraq? In the aftermath of large-scale natural disasters such as Cyclone Pam, how can cultural heritage be recovered quickly and effectively?

Over the next four weeks, 21 professionals from risk-prone areas such as Gaza, Guatemala, Haiti, Philippines, Syria and Ukraine will convene in Amsterdam to participate in the international course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis, jointly organized by ICCROM, the Smithsonian Institution, the Netherlands National Commission of UNESCO, and 11 national institutions including the Netherlands Ministries of Culture and Education.

This is the fourth international course on First Aid, organized within the framework of ICCROM’s multi-partner programme on disaster risk management.

First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis aims to equip proactive cultural “first aiders” with the necessary skills and knowledge to work with communities and other mainstream emergency actors to protect cultural heritage amidst an unfolding crisis situation.

“Culture cannot wait, the credo of the First Aid training stems from the idea that for communities uprooted by disasters, culture in its both tangible and intangible forms, provides a thread of continuity and helps in overcoming the trauma of loss and displacement, therefore, it cannot be separated from humanitarian assistance”, says Aparna Tandon, the course leader and ICCROM Project Specialist. Continue reading…