Protecting Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

July 20, 2016

Protecting Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

The economic losses from disasters are now reaching an average of US$250 to US$300 billion each year, according to the Global Assessment Report of 2015 – a resource for analyzing and understanding disaster risk globally, today and in the future. Conflicts are equally devastating – in 2014, 42 500 people were displaced by violence and con­flict every day. (Refer to the  report of the High Level Panel on Humanitarian Financing Gap) Continue reading…


First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

June 2, 2016

The Fifth International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis Starts

first_aid_1“I would like to prepare for recovery and reconstruction of Mosul’s cultural heritage,” says Layla Salih, an Iraqi participant of the Fifth International Course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis (FAC) which opened today at the Smithsonian Castle, Washington DC, USA.  Offered within the framework of ICCROM’s multi-partner programme on Disaster Risk Management, the FAC course is aimed at enhancing national, regional and local capacities for protecting cultural heritage during complex and protracted crises. Continue reading…


Measuring the impact of heritage science

July 15, 2015

ICCROM Forum follow up: Think-tank meeting Evaluating the Outcomes of Heritage Science

How to measure impact? Where to start?

Grupo photoDemonstrating impact is a high priority in many fields – especially those which rely on effective fundraising and public support for survival – and in recent years there has been increasing activity in this area with regard to culture and cultural heritage. However, while there is growing recognition of the importance  of evaluating outcomes and impact, at the same time there are widespread difficulties in establishing common frameworks, language and methods. In other words, although it is easy to see the merits of the exercise, it remains difficult to apply in practice.

Continue reading…


First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

March 27, 2015

30 March – 24 April 2015, Netherlands

First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis

Is it possible to save cultural heritage from the intentional targeting that we are witnessing in Syria and Iraq? In the aftermath of large-scale natural disasters such as Cyclone Pam, how can cultural heritage be recovered quickly and effectively?

Over the next four weeks, 21 professionals from risk-prone areas such as Gaza, Guatemala, Haiti, Philippines, Syria and Ukraine will convene in Amsterdam to participate in the international course on First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis, jointly organized by ICCROM, the Smithsonian Institution, the Netherlands National Commission of UNESCO, and 11 national institutions including the Netherlands Ministries of Culture and Education.

This is the fourth international course on First Aid, organized within the framework of ICCROM’s multi-partner programme on disaster risk management.

First Aid to Cultural Heritage in Times of Crisis aims to equip proactive cultural “first aiders” with the necessary skills and knowledge to work with communities and other mainstream emergency actors to protect cultural heritage amidst an unfolding crisis situation.

“Culture cannot wait, the credo of the First Aid training stems from the idea that for communities uprooted by disasters, culture in its both tangible and intangible forms, provides a thread of continuity and helps in overcoming the trauma of loss and displacement, therefore, it cannot be separated from humanitarian assistance”, says Aparna Tandon, the course leader and ICCROM Project Specialist. Continue reading…


CollAsia Course on Handling, Packing and Moving Collections Ends

February 20, 2015

Group photo with the ICCROM and CollAsia flags, taken from above

The CollAsia international course on Handling, Packing and Moving Collections came to a close in Kuching, Malaysia. Organized by ICCROM and the Sarawak Museum Department, with the support of the Korean Cultural Heritage Administration (CHA), the CollAsia activity aimed to improve scientific literacy and critical thinking skills among the diverse professionals caring for Southeast Asian heritage collections.

The training activity brought together over 40 heritage specialists from 21 different countries in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. Through lectures and interactive sessions, participants explored the scientific principles underlying past and present systems, materials and work practices, as well as the manufacture, use and conservation of collections.

Participants were encouraged to share the traditional collections conservation practices in their countries during the Conference Day held on 16 January. Study visits were organized to Sarawak Cultural Village and the Bidayuh longhouse of Kampung Benuk, to learn and draw new ideas for research from the rich living heritage of the local communities around Kuching. Continue reading…


CollAsia Course on Handling, Packing and Moving Collections

January 14, 2015

12 – 30 January 2015, Sarawak Museum Department, Kuching, Malaysia

Logo-CollAsia-1

With over 40 specialists from Asia-Pacific and beyond, the CollAsia international course on Handling, Packing and Moving Collections is taking place 12 – 30 January 2015 in the Natural History Museum, Sarawak Museum Department, Kuching, Malaysia.

Organized by the Sarawak Museum Department and ICCROM, with the support of the Korean Cultural Heritage Administration (CHA), the course aims to improve scientific literacy and critical thinking skills among the diverse professionals caring for Southeast Asian heritage collections.

The course focuses on scientific principles underlying past and present systems for managing museum objects, materials and work practices, as well as the manufacture, use and conservation of collections. Participants are encouraged to share traditional collections conservation practices used in their countries. The course identifies, reviews, discusses and compares living cultural practices and current conservation principles and approaches relevant to the theme of the course. It also encourages further research into developing innovative solutions.

The intensive training activity consists of lectures and interactive sessions, both in the classroom and around Sarawak, with practical exercises. Continue reading…